Traffic Violations

Our attorneys can assist you in several aspects of traffic violations. Our clients with cases in Virginia’s traffic courts often face charges as simple as speeding and reckless driving that can have complicated and far-reaching consequences. Our attorneys have the experience in some of Virginia’s busiest traffic courts to work closely with the arresting officers and the court to reach the best possible resolution for our clients.

We offer a full range of legal services for our clients with traffic violations.

If your found guilty of speeding, you will likely face:

  • Fines and costs up to $500

  • Three to six points on your license

  • Higher insurance rates

Don’t be fooled into thinking that an out of state violation won’t affect your license; the majority of other states accept Virginia convictions. Even if you have prepaid your ticket we can help. Just because you were speeding, that doesn’t mean you actually have to be found guilty of a moving violation! Even if you’ve prepaid your ticket or missed a court date, we can still help you resolve the matter with a positive outcome. A conviction will stay on your record for years and Virginia shares information with the majority of other states.

If you’re found guilty of recless driving, you will likely face:

  • Class One Misdemeanor (same level as a DUI)

  • Punishable by up to one year in jail and $2,500 in fines

  • Six points on your license and dramatically higher insurance rates

  • Potential license suspension of six months

Avoid conviction. Just because you were charged, that doesn’t mean you actually have to be found guilty! Even if you’ve already been found guilty or missed a court date, we can still help you resolve the matter with a positive outcome. Statistically you are more likely in Virginia to go to jail for going over 90 mph than you are for drunk driving. A reckless conviction will result in you having a criminal record, which is permanent. This can effect your current job, future employment and security clearance. But, just because you were charged, that doesn’t mean you actually have to be found guilty!

Driving without a license or while suspended are serious offenses punishable by jail, high fines and additional suspension. If you have been convicted previously of one of these offenses active jail time is likely and in some cases mandatory. There are ways to avoid these convictions and keep you out of jail. No person shall drive any motor vehicle on any highway in the Commonwealth until such person has applied for a driver’s license, as provided in this article, satisfactorily passed the examination required and obtained a driver’s license, nor unless the license is valid. A violation of this section is a Class 2 misdemeanor. A second or subsequent violation of this section is a Class 1 misdemeanor. Upon conviction under this section, the court may suspend the person’s privilege to drive for a period not to exceed 90 days.

The state of Virginia provides that no person shall drive any motor vehicle on any highway until the person has obtained a valid driver’s license. There are certain exemptions to this rule such as non-residents driving on a license from their state, but generally, a resident must have a license before driving in Virginia.

A first offense of this provision is a Class 2 misdemeanor and second or subsequent offenses are charged as Class 1 misdemeanors.  As such, a first offense carries a potential punishment of confinement in jail for not more than six months and a fine of not more than $1,000.  A second or subsequent offense carries a potential punishment of confinement in jail for not more than twelve months and a fine of not more than $2,500. The judge may suspended a persons driving privileges for up to 90 days upon the conviction of any offense under section 46.2-300.

In reality, judges rarely impose the maximum punishment and “standard” punishments differ from one jurisdiction to another. While it is theoretically possible to receive a jail upon conviction of a first offense, this outcome would be unusual in most jurisdictions.  Judges do occasionally impose jail on a second offense and regularly impose jail on third and  subsequent offenses.

Failure to obey a traffic signal results in a Virginia red light ticket and is a 4-demerit violation in Virginia.  You will also be cited for all other traffic violations that incur, such as failing to yield to a pedestrian, manslaughter, reckless driving and many more infractions that may result from running a red light.  Running red lights or committing traffic violations could result in a ‘habitual offender’ status; your license can be suspended or revoked and you will pay hefty fines in order to earn back your driving privileges.

Along with the addition of demerits to your driving record, a Virginia red light ticket, the many dangers that can occur, the damage you can do to other drivers and pedestrians, and the possibility of Virginia license suspension and revocation, depending on the amount of damage that occurs due to your red light running, you will also pay a fine for your infraction.

If you’re found guilty of DUI in Virginia:

  • First Offense

    • Class one misdemeanor, punishable up to one year in jail and $2,500 in fines. Mandatory license suspension of one year.

    • Court has discretion over the use of a restricted license. Required completion of a mandatory alcohol safety class. Installation of interlock device (breath alcohol test) required on registered vehicles.

  • Second Offense, within five years

    • Class one misdemeanor, same maximum penalties as first offense. Mandatory twenty days in jail, license suspension for three years. No restricted license for first year. Manditory ignition interlock.

  • Second Offense, within ten years

    • Class one misdemeanor, same maximum penalties as first offense. Mandatory ten days in jail, license suspension for three years. No restricted license for four months. Manditory ignition interlock.

  • Third Offense, within five years

    • Class six felony, punishable up to five years in the Virginia Department of Corrections and $2,500 in fines. Mandatory prison term of six months. Indefinite license suspension.

Blood alcohol levels of .15 and higher means additional, mandatory jail time. Make sure you hire a qualified attorney; one that knows the local system and regularly works with police, prosecutors and the DUI courts to ensure clients are properly represented with outstanding results.

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A consultation will help us determine the best course of action in your case, please contact us to schedule an appointment.

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