Immigration

Immigration law is a complicated area, involving various federal agencies, rules and regulations. Our experienced immigration attorneys can navigate your application for permanent residence, citizenship, a visa or deportation relief through these bureaucratic waters, giving you the greatest chance of success.

Please visit our FAQ to gain additional knowlesge surrounding your legal matter.

When you retain an immigration lawyer to represent you, that lawyer must evaluate your immigration history, understand your short and long-term goals, and present your legal options.
Immigration law is a highly-complex, rapidly changing area of law. The various government agencies or courts hand down cases on a daily basis. These decisions come from the immigration courts, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA), the Administrative Appeals Unit (AAU), the Board of Alien Labor Certification Appeals (BALCA), the U.S. Federal Courts and sometimes the United States Supreme Court.

  • Family-Based Green Cards: Fiance(e) visas; spousal petitions; immediate relative or preference category petitions; sibling, parent or child petitions; adjustment of status and consular processing cases; petitions to remove conditions on lawful permanent residence.
  • Employment-Based Green Cards: Labor Certifications, EB-1 (Extraordinary Ability, Outstanding Professors or Researchers or Multinational Managers), EB-2 (Advanced Degree professionals, Exceptional Ability or National Interest Waiver), EB-3 (Skilled, Unskilled or Other Workers).
  • Nonimmigrant (temporary) Visas (General): For example, visitors (B-2); students (F-1), including Motion to Reopen Reinstatement Denials; religious workers (R).
  • Nonimmigrant (temporary) Visas (Business): B-1, E-1, E-2, H-1B, H-2A, H-2B, L-1A, L-1B, O, P.
  • Citizenship & Naturalization. Preparation and filing of Naturalization Application, Continued Cases, Acquisition/ Derivation of Citizenship, and Petitions for Re-Hearing.
  • Other: Embassy Visa Denials, Customs & Border Patrol Admission Issues, Delayed Processing at Local Offices, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
With the initiation of DACA in 2012, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program, hundreds of thousands of these young people have enjoyed the benefits of widened access to the American mainstream.

Please review more information online about the DREAM Act.

Please bring with you to the consultation all paperwork related to your immigration status and of which you are in possession, including, for example: all passports (current and expired), your lawful permanent resident card, your driver license, social security card, copies of forms which you have already submitted to USCIS (for example, I-130, I-751, N-400), all USCIS notices (Forms I-797), and any supporting documents a copy of which you have already provided to USCIS.

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A consultation will help us determine the best course of action in your case, please contact us to schedule an appointment.

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